Hudson Remodeling News

Local tile, hardwood and carpet options that will floor you

Posted 30 October 2019 by Team Hudson

Upgrading your flooring is an amazing way to change the look and feel of your home. From the classic look of hardwood to the cushy comfort of carpet, flooring can be chosen to match your intended style or set an ideal mood.

But how do Whatcom County homeowners know which options are better quality? How do you know which products will last into the next generation?

One way to ensure that you’re getting your money’s worth in flooring is to buy local. Doing so gives you access to a team of experts who know their craft inside and out. When homeowners work with a design/build contractor like Hudson Remodeling, they essentially are tapping into our team of vendors, each of which is an expert in its own area. These Whatcom flooring professionals know what brands will wear well and what options are a no-go for our Pacific Northwest climate.

If you’re looking to refresh your home through upgraded flooring, let’s dive into some of the options:

Hardwood flooring: High-quality hardwood flooring is typically the most expensive option for flooring, but there truly is nothing like it. While there are excellent products out there that come close to mimicking the look and feel of hardwood, many customers still choose actual wood flooring for its durability and timeless look. As you can see from this recent project, hardwood floors can contribute to a stunning overall look for your home. For hardwood flooring, Hudson Remodeling often chooses Bellingham’s Robinson Hardwood & Homes on Grant Street.

Carpet: When underfoot softness is what you want, there really is no substitute. There’s simply nothing like wall-to-wall carpet for increasing the overall comfort and coziness of a room. As with any flooring option, though, it’s important to install good-quality carpet that will resist stains and wear so that it still looks good 10 or 20 years down the road. For great carpet, Hudson Remodeling chooses The Color Pot on North State Street in Bellingham.

Tile: With its large variety of styles, materials and uses, floor tile continues to be a popular option for homeowners. One bathroom Hudson Remodeling renovated recently received gorgeous black and white tiles with a pattern reminiscent of styles common in Spain and Portugal. Another was outfitted with 12-inch-by-24-inch ceramic tiles. For floor tile, Hudson Remodeling works with Aqui Esta Tile on Grant Street in Bellingham. Some customers’ tile is also sourced from The Color Pot.

Vinyl and linoleum: Luxury vinyl plank flooring (not that cheap stuff you might remember from your childhood) is a beautiful option that is seeing a big resurgence these days. Linoleum, which is one of the most eco-friendly flooring options you can buy, also is seeing a comeback. The materials used to make linoleum are cost-effective, natural, biodegradable and renewable. And the reason for the growth of vinyl flooring? Advances in technology have made it cost-effective to produce plank-style vinyl flooring with surface designs and embossing that help it emulate real wood or even stone tile. For great linoleum and vinyl options, Hudson Remodeling prefers Mobile Floor Coverings on Hammer Drive in Bellingham.

Are you considering some exciting flooring upgrades in your home? Give Hudson Remodeling a call today.

The benefits of bumping out

Posted 27 September 2019 by Team Hudson

Here’s the scenario:

You’ve got a bathroom that’s about one walk-in shower too small, but you don’t want to take space from the neighboring bedroom to get it there.

Or perhaps your galley kitchen is just begging for a more comfortable working triangle, but with other important parts of the house surrounding it, you’d rather not steal from Peter to pay Paul.

A creative bump-out addition — or a micro-addition, as they’re sometimes called — can be the difference-maker here. Moving a section of exterior wall out a few feet is often the best way to gain additional space indoors, with the only loss being a little yard or garden space.

What could you do with a bump out?

A strategic bump out could add an eating area to your kitchen, a stand-alone shower to your bathroom, a reading nook or home office to the living room, a powder room to a hallway or walk-in closet to a bedroom, among other things. The choices are many. Heck, if you’re one of those people who still uses your garage to park cars, you could add bump-out space in the garage that gives you a workbench and tool storage.

Hudson Remodeling completed a bump-out addition recently that gave our clients a second-floor lounge area, complete with fireplace and small deck. The new room takes advantage of the home’s stellar Lake Whatcom views while integrating seamlessly into the rest of the home, both inside and out.

How big can a bump out be?

How big your new space can be depends largely on how you build it. If you’re supporting the addition with a foundation or footings, you can typically go out as far as your yard size will allow. If the bump out is cantilevered — with no support underneath — then you’ll be limited by the length of the joists inside the home. Cantilevering is done by attaching new joists to existing ones, and in most cases the length of the joist outside the home can’t be more than half of the length inside.

You also want to keep in mind the aesthetics of the home when designing your addition; ideally, as it did with the Lake Whatcom home we worked on, the add-on will fit seamlessly into the look of the rest of the home. Hiring a design/build contractor can really save you here, as you’ll get someone who will take into account not only the aesthetics of the addition but also its feasibility and fit with your budget.

Of course, the size of your little addition also will depend on what it’s being used for. You could go out as little as two feet to add needed kitchen space, six feet to turn your powder room into a master bath, or even 10 or 12 feet to add an entirely new room. The choice is yours!

Whatever your plans, the design/build team here at Hudson Remodeling can handle it. To discuss your upcoming bump-out project and how it might add much-needed space to your home, give the pros at Hudson a call.

Tile work puts stylish stamp on bathroom remodeling project

Posted 30 August 2019 by Team Hudson

Here at Hudson Remodeling, one of our calling cards has always been our crews’ attention to detail. Nowhere has that focus been more evident than on this two-bath renovation project we did in Whatcom County.

This Bellingham project gave new life to a master and guest bathroom, both of which were completely gutted and remodeled. This photo gallery includes some before-and-after shots of the work to help you get a full picture of the bathroom remodel project. As you can see, it was quite a change!

Master bath upgrades

In the master bathroom, we removed the old fiberglass shower, fiberglass soaking tub, toilet and mirror. We also ripped out the old vinyl flooring and underlayment in preparation for a gorgeous new floor of 12-inch-by-24-inch ceramic tile.

This giant walk-in shower replaced a fiberglass soaker tub and shower surround.

The plan here was to replace the old shower and bathtub with a spacious tiled shower, so we framed in a 4-foot-by-6-foot space with room for a trench drain, tiled bench, tiled footrest and large niche.

On the shower wall, we installed large, warm gray tiles, similar to the tiles we placed on the bathroom floor. Adding interest to the shower walls is a decorate stripe of black mosaic tile, running from one end to the other and also filling in the back of the two-shelf niche. On the floor of the shower and the top of the bench seat, our crews installed sliced black stone to complete the look.

We installed a wall-to-wall (approximately 10-foot-long) vanity cabinet, crafted by Northwest Woodslayer here in Bellingham, and over that placed a black granite countertop with dual rectangular, undermount sinks.

This new faucet in the master bathroom is set off by a gorgeous hexagonal backsplash that runs up to the ceiling.

On the wall over the vanity, we ran a stunning hexagonal tile up to the ceiling, framing three flush-mount medicine cabinets with inline lights. Two of the cabinets contain electrical outlets, and one houses a pull-out magnifying mirror.

We also installed a heated tile floor in the master bathroom, with a touch-screen programmable timer. In the vanity sink cabinet, we installed a hot-water recirculating pump to improve the delivery of hot water to the sinks and the shower.

Guest bath upgrades

The plan in the guest bath was to continue the look, with some slightly different choices. The old fiberglass tub/shower combo came out, to be replaced with a stylish acrylic soaker tub and tiled shower surround.

The shower wall tile in the guest bath is the same as the master, with a similar decorative stripe and niche — but with slightly different tile. In the guest bath, we used a pearl-finish dark tile in a brick pattern, and that same tile continued over to the backsplash above the black granite countertop.

The guest bath upgrades were similar to those in the master bath, with a long maple hardwood vanity and beautiful tile work.

As in the master, Hudson’s crews installed dual under-mount rectangular sinks in the guest bath. For a backsplash, we installed four rows of the 4-inch, rectangular, pearl-finish tile under a large, framed mirror that covers almost the entire wall. The mirror is actually the one that was in the old bathroom, but Hudson’s carpenters built a wood frame for it that matches the new maple hardwood cabinets.

Backsplash detail in the guest bath.

We converted the existing electrical outlets to GFCI, for safety, and installed an additional outlet above the vanity. Additional details in the guest bathroom remodel include a new exhaust fan with timer switch and baseboard made of floor tile.

The abundance of detailed tile work made this quite a fun job for our team, and we’re proud of the end result. Of course, the fact that the homeowner loves the work is the best reward of all.

Planning a kitchen remodel? Here’s what you need to know.

Posted 23 July 2019 by Team Hudson

The kitchen really is the castle itself. This is where we spend our happiest moments and where we find the joy of being a family.

-American chef Mario Batali

In most homes, the kitchen truly is — above all the other beloved rooms in the house — the room we share. That fact alone is probably the biggest reason kitchens are such a popular room for remodeling. If we are going to spend so much of our time in the kitchen, after all, why not make it a room we truly love?

If you have been considering a kitchen remodel for your Whatcom County home, there are a few things — based on Hudson’s years of experience in completing kitchen remodels throughout the Pacific Northwest — that you might want to consider while planning your own project:

This CAD rendering helped the homeowner visualize the new kitchen, the finished version of which is shown below.

Work with a designer and get a CAD rendering of the kitchen plans to help you visualize the design and workflow of the new kitchen. There truly is no better way to envision the space than to see a 3D rendering of it. Working with an experienced kitchen designer will help you be sure that you’re getting a kitchen that flows and functions well years down the road.

Don’t buy low-quality cabinets or countertops; as items you see and use every single day, these should be well-made and long-lasting. Cheap cabinets might look good for the first year or so, but for long-term satisfaction, an investment in high-quality cabinets is essential.

Plan for lots of people in the kitchen. Whether you’re expecting it or not, your new kitchen will probably end up being the place family and friends tend to congregate (even more than your current one). Consider adding a working bar or opening up views to the living room. Especially if your current kitchen is on the smallish side, now’s a good time to open it up for more space. Here’s where that CAD rendering can come in handy, as without one it can be difficult to visualize a completely new space.

Include bells and whistles that you’ll be thankful for in the future, like under-cabinet lighting, a pantry cabinet and an appliance garage. Make gourmet coffee every day? Consider a small coffee nook in one corner for your gadgets. Have heirloom serving dishes from your great-grandmother? Consider a glass-fronted corner cabinet with built-in lighting.

If you can help it, avoid moving the sink, dishwasher, stove or refrigerator, as this can add complication and cost. On the other hand, while you’re having the work done, it’s worth doing it right — so if you do need to rearrange the kitchen, do it now.

Want red cabinets? Go for it!

Save your quirky personal style choices for things that are inexpensive — but only if you’re planning to sell within the year.  If you’re not planning to sell, go ahead build the home you want to live in instead of crafting it for an anonymous, potential buyer. After all, you could have the pleasure of enjoying your fun and stylish choices for many years. Want a lime green counter? Go for it!

Expect to pay around $50,000 to $70,000 for a complete remodel (more if you factor in the cost of new appliances). At Hudson, our starting price for a small remodel is around $40,000. The 2019 national average for a midrange major kitchen remodel is over $65,000, with an upscale remodel double that, at $132,000, according to the 2019 Remodeling Cost vs. Value Report.

To chat with a professional at Hudson Remodeling about your kitchen remodel plans in Bellingham, Ferndale, Lynden or elsewhere in Whatcom or Skagit counties, give us a call at 360-354-7006 or email us at info@hudsonremodeling.com.

What can you do with that basement space?

Posted 28 June 2019 by Team Hudson

There are two ways to look at an unfinished basement:

  1. It’s a dank, scary place full of spiders and probably other gross things.
  2. It’s a gold mine just waiting to be tapped!

Since you’re reading this, we know you’re the type of person to look at a basement as a huge remodeling opportunity. Kudos to you! We like you already.

Here are a few ideas for using a basement remodel to turn that dark underground space into a useful, functional and fun room you’ll love to visit.

Art studio or craft area: Let your ideas run wild in a space crafted just to your tastes. Maybe you want a large, open painting studio, or perhaps you’d like to build a photography darkroom into one corner. Maybe you’d like a comfortable nook for your sewing machine with a wall cabinet dedicated to your favorite yards of cloth? Or how about a huge drafting table, large-format printer or sculpting table? Whatever your artistic passion, odds are your basement can become the art studio of your dreams.

Fitness room: That basement space might be perfect for a few pieces of exercise equipment. A stationary bike here, a Nordic Track there, a set of free weights in the corner next to the rowing machine… your basement could make the perfect home gym!

Media center: This one’s becoming a classic basement idea — nice leather couches, large flat-screen television, nearby bathroom, maybe even a fireplace or wet bar. Hudson Remodeling’s carpenters recently added a bar to one home here in Whatcom County, and it’s a real treat!

Hudson Remodeling recently added this small bar to a Bellingham home during a basement remodel.

Library or study: Some man caves are all about sports and video games, while others are decked with book-lined walls framing a large fireplace opposite a desk for studying and a wing-backed chair for reading. If a basement book library sounds like your idea of fun, we’d love to chat with you about ideas!

Laundry room: Perhaps you’re already using your basement as a laundry room. But couldn’t it be so much nicer? Maybe you could use space for a large washbasin or a wall-mounted drying rack? You spend a lot of time doing laundry, and you should be able do it in a renovated laundry room.

In a basement remodel, the addition of large window wells like this one create easy ways to exit the home in an emergency while also providing ample natural light.

Guest apartment: There are so many possibilities here. You could craft a cute space for your mother-in-law to live in close proximity to the family. You could build an apartment that can be rented out on Airbnb or Vrbo. You could create a suite for that day when one of your kids inevitably needs to crash at your house for a month. All of these are wonderful ideas; just be sure to check your local building regulations regarding the addition of any cooking facilities or additional dwelling units (often referred to as ADUs) to your basement.

Home office: Technology is making remote work an increasing possibility these days. Consider carving out some space in your basement for a secluded home office that offers the tranquility of an office with the comforts of proximity to the finer points of home life — like your spouse, kids and the coffee maker. Capitalize on the natural light coming from large window wells to improve the quality of the workspace.

Playroom: One of the high points of remodeling your basement to serve as the kids’ play area is that you – and your guests – will rarely have to see whatever mess your children have going on down there. Plus, a basement playroom would give the kids space to be a little louder than they might get to be elsewhere in the house. A win for both kids and parents! Whatever your idea for your unfinished basement, please give us a call if you’d like to talk about plans. Hudson Remodeling has years of experience with many types of home remodels throughout Whatcom County.

Bring your 80s- or 90s-era home into the present

Posted 30 May 2019 by Team Hudson

Homes built near the end of the last century had distinctive design features. Remember these?

Fake flooring. Octagonal windows. Hunter green and maroon wallpaper. Plastic drawer pulls and plasticky cabinets. Soaker tubs and carpet in the bathroom. Half-round windows with sunburst shutters set into sponge-painted walls.

Oh, yeah. The 1980s and 1990s were a glorious time for home decor.

Overall home structure suffered a bit in that time period, too, with split-levels dominating the scene and banks of free-hanging kitchen cabinets all the rage.

Whatcom County’s population has more than doubled since the 1980s — from 100,000 in 1980 to 170,000 in 2000 to 220,000 today — and all those people have to live somewhere. Whatcom County is full of ’80s and ’90s homes that, despite decent bones and potential, could use a little leap into the present.

Is yours one of those homes? Read on. Homes from the 1980s and ’90s can totally be fixed. Here’s how:

Improve the flow. While you may not be able to undo the split-level glory of your home, there’s a lot you can do to improve the overall feel of the house. Knocking out strategic walls can improve flow and open sightlines. Widening hallways, adding windows and adding lighter finishes can diminish the cave-like feeling of many older homes. This also can have the side benefit of enabling your home to be more livable in your later years.

Go tub-free. There must have been a point in the past when we felt we had all the time in the world to soak our cares away in our master-bath Jacuzzis. Even if we do have time to spare, most people are finding that it’s better enjoyed in a spacious shower than in a black — or pink, or beige — bathtub. Swapping the old soaker tub for a relaxing shower not only makes it more fun to get clean, but it also does wonders for the visual feel of a bathroom.

Update trim. Homes built toward the end of last century weren’t big on trim. Bull-nosed drywall was a common way to trim out windows, and when trim was used, it was thin and unassuming. On one recent job, we updated some of the trim to a wider craftsman/modern style. The change was such an improvement that we were able to retain the slightly dated slab doors and butternut color window linings, saving the client some money. Instead of fighting the trim color, we embraced it and used an updated profile that made a big impact.

Update the kitchen cabinets. Taking out the awkward hanging bank of cabinets and/or bar counter and opening up passage to the living/dining room is one quick way to make a massive improvement to an older kitchen. We did that on one recent home, and the results are astounding. If you’re not ready to go that far, though, simply updating the style of your cabinets or even painting them can make a difference.

Homes built in the 1980s and 1990s have a ton of potential! Updating them just takes an eye for the needs of you and your family and the look of the home you want to live in.

Need help with any of these projects? Hudson Remodeling has been sprucing up Whatcom County homes for years, and we know the ins and outs of both whole-house remodels and selective improvements to turn 1980s and 1990s homes into timeless treasures.

Bellingham home remodeled to create master bath, office space

Posted 24 April 2019 by Team Hudson

Hudson Remodeling recently completed a multi-room remodel at a cute home in Bellingham that resulted in a new powder room, a conjoined master bedroom and office, an expanded master bathroom and improvements to the living room.

Let’s start with the bathrooms. To create the new powder room, we removed built-in cabinetry from the master bathroom and hallway. We removed the existing hardwood floor to install gorgeous black and white tiles with a pattern reminiscent of styles common in Spain and Portugal. The powder room got a new toilet and the original bathroom’s pedestal sink, installed against a background wall of crisp, gray subway tiles.

In the original bathroom, we created additional space by removing the brick chimney and expanding into the bedroom closet. We removed the existing white tile and laid down some radiant heating cable, above which we installed the same patterned tile from the new powder room. We connected the bathroom and bedroom with a new doorway, framing the wall just wide enough to accommodate the furnace venting that we moved out of the chimney. We slid the toilet back against the new wall and, on the other side, installed a length of cherry hardwood cabinets with Shaker-style doors and slab drawers. A new tall cherry linen cabinet was installed at one end to frame the Cambria quartz countertop with undermount sink. For a backsplash, we installed a coordinated length of tile in a gray-marbled basket-weave pattern. The chrome and stainless steel accents throughout the room — faucet, door handles, light fixtures and more — add elegance and tie together the honey-brown wood and patterned tile floor.

In the master bedroom, we moved a wall that had been dividing the space in two, using hardwood from the powder room to seamlessly patch the floor. We removed some built-in cabinetry from the bedroom and framed in a new closet (the old one was removed to make space for the bathroom). We also installed a new window in the bedroom, refinished the hardwood flooring there and in the hallway, and gave the walls and ceilings several fresh coats of paint. The result is a spacious new bedroom with adjoining master bathroom and office that makes much more functional sense.

Out in the living room, we installed a new wood fireplace mantel and retiled the hearth with a larger, darker tile that better matches the home’s existing style.

In the end, the homeowner was pleased with Hudson Remodeling’s ability to update the home with modern conveniences while retaining the house’s original character and style. Another successful Bellingham home renovation is in the books!

Darker colors are among trends in exterior home design

Posted 27 March 2019 by Team Hudson

Dark house paint colors are in. In recent years, more and more homeowners have been choosing darker shades for their painting projects. Dark green, brown or blue homes with bright white trim can make a beautiful statement. You needn’t stop there, though. Many new projects also are featuring both darker trim and siding, resulting in dark-on-dark color schemes. Other homes stick with the classic dark-and-light combination — but reversed, with light siding (think white, light yellow or a classic pale green) with deep black trim.

What else is hot in exterior design and remodeling? Let’s take a look.

Shake siding: This goes well with the trend of dark home exteriors, as natural cedar can create stunning curb appeal, as seen in this job we completed near Lake Whatcom. Don’t be shy about painting your shake, though. With so many gorgeous colors available, the options are practically limitless (maybe take inspiration from these colors of the year). Cedar takes paint well, but be sure to prime it first.

Painted brick: Speaking of paint, painted brick is another trend that can add fresh appeal to a home’s exterior. As a siding material, brick has staying power, and painted brick certainly does too, as it’s been done for years. If you’ve been thinking about painting yours, perhaps now’s the time. By the way, brick is being painted on new construction and remodels, too, so if your home doesn’t have any existing brick to paint, don’t fear!

A return to older styles: Shake and brick not your thing? Another fun trend of late is the re-emergence of such styles as shiplap siding and board and batten. Both styles offer classic looks that continue to stand the test of time (as opposed to, say, grooved plywood siding). Shiplap was a lot more common around here in the first part of the 20th century, before plywood became commonly used. It was often used as a substrate for flooring and roofing materials, but it works well as a siding option, too.

Outdoor living spaces: You don’t have to live in the southern U.S. to make use of outdoor living spaces. In fact, being in the PNW is all the more reason — where on earth is more beautiful than here? Homeowners today are making true use of their outdoor spaces, using such elements as high-quality furniture and built-in cooking appliances in covered spaces truly meant to be extensions of the home. Need some inspiration? Check out this gallery from House Beautiful.

Learn more: Porches, patios and sunrooms
make the most of summer living
.

If you’re considering an update to your Pacific Northwest home, contact us here at Hudson, and we’d love to walk you through these options and many more.

Green remodeling: Five ways to do it

Posted 25 February 2019 by Team Hudson

Ready to step beyond Energy Star appliance upgrades to reduce energy consumption in your home? There are a number of ways to incorporate green construction into your home remodeling plans, reducing the carbon footprint of the work, increasing the sustainability of your home long into the future, and saving money in energy costs.

Go tankless. Traditional hot water tanks can be energy drains, because they spend a lot of time heating water that’s just sitting around unused. Whether your water tank is heated by electricity or gas, it wastes a lot of energy keeping the water temperature at the desired level. A tankless water heater, on the other hand, heats water only on demand, using much less energy to deliver hot water throughout your home. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, tankless water heaters are up to 34 percent more efficient than the storage tank variety.

Get aggressive on passive solar. Passive solar techniques can make a major difference in the amount of energy you use to warm up or cool down your home. In the winter, large, south-facing windows can be used to let in as much warm sunlight as possible into the rooms on that side of the house. Materials that soak up warmth from direct sunlight and slowly release it throughout the day and night — including concrete, bricks and stone — also can provide free winter heat sources for your home. In the summer, when you want your home to remain cooler, overhanging eaves block most overhead rays, providing shade and keeping heat out of the home.

Let there be light. Large picture windows and skylights can increase the amount of natural light that filters into the home, reducing the need to have electric lights burning energy throughout the day. And when extra light is needed, such as on summer nights or winter evenings, LED bulbs can provide major savings. LEDs generally use 75 percent less energy and last 25 times as long as incandescent lighting. That energy savings is mostly because LEDs run cool; 90 percent of the energy from incandescent bulbs goes and 80 percent of the energy from CFLs go to heat, according to energy.gov. That’s a terrible use of energy from a device that you only need to produce light.

Say no to toxins. These days, it’s not too hard to find paint and other household finishings that don’t make your breathing air hazardous to your health. And not only do non-toxic, water-based paints improve your air quality, they’re also better for the environment. Consider this: According to the California Air Resources Board, more than two-thirds of the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in the air there come from paints and coatings.

Use recycled materials. Making good use of previously used products (wood, cabinets, sinks, appliances and more) can be a great way to limit the environmental impact of a remodel. When you can reuse something instead of throwing it in a landfill and buying a new one, you’ve aided the Earth on several levels. For a good start in Whatcom County, consider looking at the RE Store or Habitat for Humanity store, both in Bellingham.

As you’ve probably noticed, this is far from an exhaustive list! Contact Hudson Remodeling for ideas and to chat about how we can reduce the carbon footprint of your remodel. Or catch us at the Whatcom County Home and Garden Show March 1 to 3 in Lynden!

Taking a look at ‘modern farmhouse’ design

Posted 30 January 2019 by Team Hudson

Home. For so many people, it’s a place of comfort, a place for family, a place to gather around the big dining room table after a hard day’s work and laugh and play with friends. Home is a well-lived-in, well-loved place of coziness and relaxation.

This feeling, this idea, is what people often are aiming for when they decorate in certain styles. Remember “shabby chic” and its focus on things like antique furniture, distressed-wood touches and built-in cabinets? Or the “classic farmhouse” style with its sturdy, practical furniture, apron sinks and natural wood accents?

Lately, we’ve been seeing a number of customers with new takes on these classic decorating styles. They’re going for more of a “modern farmhouse” look, which in many ways is a direct descendent of both shabby chic and classic farmhouse styles. Let’s take a look at a few modern farmhouse elements. Maybe you’ll find yourself incorporating some of these in your home!

Farmstead elements: We’ve done a number of interior door installations lately in the barn style. It’s a classic look that evokes feelings of simple living and brings with it a practical touch. These sliding doors are great space savers, akin to the pocket doors of yore, for spaces where a large swinging door wouldn’t quite fit. This door was made from locally sourced recycled wood, but you can also purchase pre-made doors at places like Home Depot. As a matter of fact, that’s where we got the barn doors for this bathroom remodel.

Rustic meets contemporary: In a nutshell, this is the core of modern farmhouse design. Distressed shelves and exposed wood beams paired with the clean, glossy feel of embedded windows create a look that is both sophisticated and traditional. More common examples of this pairing can be found in kitchens that combine stainless steel appliances, granite countertops and apron-front sinks in the farmhouse style. This kitchen even takes that a step further, with sleek appliances, modern lighting, shiny black granite countertops, bright wooden cabinets and, to add an extra modern touch to a classic kitchen centerpiece, a farmhouse-style sink in black.

Neutral palette, uncluttered space: The farmhouse look, whether classic or modern, is all about natural, neutral colors and fibers — leather chairs, natural wood furnishings, cotton fabrics, white walls. This 1909 logging bunkhouse in Lynden was brought into the modern age while retaining the classic touches that give the home its lived-in character.

What do you think? Are you considering the modern farmhouse look in your home? With its shabby chic and classic farmhouse heritage combined with contemporary touches, the style has become a comforting, inviting and modern take on interior design.

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